A Letter to the American Thyroid Association Re: Fluoride Science – International Academy of Biological Dentistry and Medicine

Earlier this year, several health professionals and scientists formally asked the American Thyroid Association (ATA) to “demonstrate either scientific integrity and professional ethics” by Publish[ing] a position statement opposing the practice of community water fluoridation (CWF) based on its impact on thyroid hormones, interference with glucose and calcium metabolism in susceptible populations, and general capacity …

This content was originally published here.

Guy Sets Up Dog Walking Group To Get Men Out In The Fresh Air And Talk About Mental Health

Rob Osman from Bristol, England, has had it pretty rough. The 38-year-old has battled with anxiety and depression for most of his life, and at one point was reduced to living in his sister’s windowless basement smoking far too much weed to care. Eventually, however, Rob found a way out of the rut.

Many things have helped him to get better, including the pursuit of a psychology and counseling degree at a local university. But the best remedy was walking his Hungarian Vizsla, Mali. As they were strolling outside, Rob felt his body relax and the tension melting away.

Realizing the huge healing power of this simple everyday activity, he set up a group called Dudes & Dogs. It’s a mental wellness community that encourages men to get out in the fresh air for a walk and talk about their feelings.

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

“Talking helps. It really does,” Osman wrote on the group’s website. “It’s helped me no end, but sometimes as men, we aren’t the best at it. Well Dudes & Dogs wants to change that for the next generation. There is no doubt things are changing. We want to be a part of that. By simply getting outside, talking things through, we can start to change our mood.”

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

It all started during one of those wet, windy, and cold days that the UK is so notorious for. There was no way in hell Rob wanted to go out, especially not the way he was feeling.

But there was the dog. She didn’t care that her owner felt like crap. She didn’t care that the weather was rubbish, she just wanted to get out and play. “It’s been the best therapy I’ve ever had,” Rob said.

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

Pretty soon Osman started inviting friends on walks with Mali. Some days they would chat but often they simply hang out. But most importantly, discovered that his friends were also benefiting from the dog and fresh. This got the man thinking if he could expand this model to more people. More men.

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

They are very resistant to seeking mental health treatment. According to a study by Priori, 40% of men won’t talk to anyone about their mental health. Dogs, however, seem to ease them into having these conversations.

“They need someone to listen,” Osman told TODAY. “The idea of using a dog gives people an hour away from the family and gets them out. Dogs are like four-legged antidepressants. When people are around them they drop their defenses. They play with the dog.”

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

To learn more about the program watch the video below

Image credits:

Image credits: jamesbeckphotography

If you want to support Dudes & Dogs, check out their crowdfunding campaign

Image credits: dudes_anddogs

Image credits:

Image credits: Rob Osman

Image credits: Rob Osman

Image credits: Rob Osman

Image credits: Rob Osman

Here’s what some of the guys who went on a walk with Rob had to say about it

This content was originally published here.

Organized dentistry expresses concerns regarding the U.S.-Mexico Tourism Improvement Act

Organized dentistry expresses concerns regarding the U.S.-Mexico Tourism Improvement Act

By Jennifer Garvin

Washington — Until Mexican programs achieve accreditation through the Commission on Dental Accreditation, U.S. dental schools should not build relationships with Mexican schools.

This was the overarching message of an April 23 letter from the Organized Dentistry Coalition to Rep. Henry Cuellar, D-Texas, lead sponsor of HR 951, the United States-Mexico Tourism Improvement Act. If passed, the legislation would expand tourism between the United States and Mexico, including for dental care.

In the letter, the organizations said they believe patients’ dental care when visiting dentists trained in non-accredited Mexican dental schools cannot be guaranteed and urged lawmakers to include this in the legislation. Currently, no Mexican dental schools are accredited through CODA.

“The Commission on Dental Accreditation serves the oral health needs of the public through the development and administration of standards that foster continuous quality improvement of dental and dental-related educational programs,” the organizations wrote. “Accreditation ensures academic quality and public accountability.

“We believe that, until Mexican programs have received CODA accreditation, U.S. dental institutions should not build relationships with Mexican institutions for the purpose of having patients visit Mexican facilities for treatment.”

The organizations also recommended that Congress consider other factors critical to patient safety such as licensure of dentists and facilities following accepted asepsis, infection control and biohazard control protocols when assessing the feasibility of building partnerships among dental institutions between the United States and Mexico.

“These safeguards are critical components to dental care that patients in the United States take for granted. Lack of attention to these details may lead to a false sense of security for patients seeking care outside of the United States,” the letter concluded.

Follow all of the ADA’s advocacy efforts at ADA.org/Advocacy.

This content was originally published here.

Florida Baker Act: 6-year-old girl sent to mental health facility after school incident – CBS News

A 6-year-old girl in Florida is “traumatized” after being sent to a mental health facility following an incident at her Jacksonville elementary school, her mother said. Nadia Falk was allegedly “out of control,” but her mom says she has special needs and is questioning the state law that allowed her to be committed to the facility.

According to a sheriff’s report, a social worker who responded to Nadia’s tantrum at Love Grove Elementary School stated the girl was a “threat to herself and others,” “destroying school property” and “attacking staff.”

She was removed from school and committed to a behavioral health center for a psychiatric evaluation under the Baker Act, which allows authorities to force such an evaluation on anyone considered to be a danger to themselves or others.

Nadia’s mother, Martina Falk, said her daughter has attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and a mood disorder.

“I specifically placed my daughter at this school back in August 2019 because I was told they had specifically trained staff to handle special needs children,” she said.

Surrounded by her legal team, Martina said the nearly two-day mandatory stay at the mental health center, away from her mother, did more harm than good.

“She’s traumatized. She is not herself anymore. I don’t know what the long-term effects are,” she told CBS News correspondent Manuel Bojorquez.

Duval County Public Schools told CBS News the decision to admit a student under the Baker Act is made by a third-party licensed mental health care professional and said, “We’ve reviewed the school’s handling of this situation and find it to be compliant both with law and the best interest of this student and all other students at the school.”

But critics ask if the Baker Act being overused, especially when it comes to school kids.

In 2018 in Cocoa, Florida, a 12-year-old boy with autism was taken to a facility in a police cruiser. It was the boy’s first day in middle school and during a meltdown, he scratched himself and then made a suicidal reference.

The boy’s mom, Staci Plonsky, said the school should have called her before enforcing the Baker Act.

“The behavior plan outlined what to do if he makes verbal threats,” she said. “They only had to follow the plan.”

The number of children involuntarily transported to a mental health center in Florida has more than doubled in the last 15 years, to about 36,000, according to a 2019 report by the Baker Act Reporting Center.

“I absolutely think that the Baker Act is being overused,” said state lawmaker Jennifer Webb.

Webb’s bill to reform the nearly 50-year-old law is being debated at the state House. It would require better training for school officials and resource officers and establish more consistent rules on exactly when a parent should be notified that their child might be committed.
 
“It should only be used as a last resort, and Baker Acting 6-year-olds just seems excessive to me,” she said.

Webb believes funds allotted for schools after the mass shooting at a high school in Parkland in 2018 can be used for better training.

Martina is now looking for a different school for Nadia.

This content was originally published here.

SBA Finalist Spotlight: Northern Virginia Orthodontics

Thank you to Northern Virginia Orthodontics for answering a few of our questions.
Congratulations on being named a finalist for Health & Wellness Business of the Year!

1.Tell us your story of how your company got to where it is today? 

After finishing my orthodontic residency at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond in 2006, my wife and I knew we wanted to move to Loudoun County. We both grew up nearby, and were aware of the planned residential growth, excellent schools, and the fact that Loudoun would be a great place to raise our kids and open an orthodontic practice. We settled on Brambleton Town Center, centrally located in Loudoun, to both live and work. With my vision to make an impact on patients, my team, and my community, I opened Northern Virginia Orthodontics in February of 2008. We saw just two patients that day, and despite the economy crashing in 2008 and 2009, NVO continued to grow thanks to our dedication to treating patients like our own family, over-delivering on top-notch service, and changing lives both inside and outside our office.

Since opening our doors in 2008, we’ve expanded twice in our Brambleton office, added the East Coast’s first, adult-only Invisalign Center, earned the title of Washingtonian Magazine’s Top 50 Places to Work, treated the most Invisalign patients in the state of Virginia, and in 2017 became the #2 Invisalign provider in the entire country.

Despite all these incredible accomplishments, what I’m most proud of is NVO’s impact on the local community. To date, NVO has donated over $1 million to local schools and organizations, as well as to pediatric cancer research and awareness. With our brand new 501(c)(3), The NVO Foundation, we can continue to do even more to help those in need right here in Loudoun County. It’s been an incredible ride going from just two patients that very first day to now seeing over 100 patients on a daily basis, but NVO is just as committed as ever to changing smiles and impacting lives.

2. What would it mean to you and your company to win a Small Business Award?  

Winning an award of this magnitude would serve as affirmation that Northern Virginia Orthodontics is impacting and improving the Loudoun County community, and would serve as fantastic recognition for our entire team.

3. If you weren’t running your own business/working at this business, what would you be doing?

I’ve always had a passion for medicine and helping others, hence becoming an orthodontist. I couldn’t imagine not working at NVO, but if I had to do anything else, I’d probably be a pilot.  I love flying and aeronautics.

4. What book are you reading right now? / What is your favorite book?

“Tools of Titans” by Tim Ferriss. It’s a study of successful people’s habits, and focuses on three critical elements – health, wealth and wise. Great read for anyone, especially business owners.

5. If you have 24-hours off, and your family was out of town, what would you do?

I’d work out, eat a healthy breakfast, then look for a D.C. sporting event to attend, like a Nationals or Capitals
game. Then a good glass of wine with dinner and call it a day – but I’d rather be with my family!

6. What is the smallest thing that has made the largest impact on your business?

Having no fear of change. It’s absolutely essential to assume risk, and to be open to change as your business grows.

7. What did you want to be when you grew up as a child? / What was a childhood dream that you had?

A professional baseball player. Baseball was my passion growing up, and remains a giant part of my family. My oldest son is currently plays baseball at the University of Arizona, and my wife and daughters love the sport as well.

8. Who is the one person that has influenced you the most in your career?

There are so many people that have influenced me along the way, but my older brother has definitely influenced me the most. He has a solution for every problem. He is an attorney by trade, but is always there when I need an opinion on anything business-wise and has been a huge part of NVO’s success.

9. What is your favorite thing about running a business in Loudoun County?

The growth and success of the county, and the pro-business mindset of its leaders.

10. If you’re not in the office where can we find you?

At my son’s baseball game, my daughters’ soccer games, a local winery, a D.C. sporting event, teaching the orthodontic residents at MCV (Medical College of Virginia), or out helping others.

11. What is your favorite weekend activity in Loudoun County?

Visiting one of Loudoun County’s many incredible wineries with family and friends.

The post SBA Finalist Spotlight: Northern Virginia Orthodontics appeared first on Loudoun Chamber.

This content was originally published here.

Medicare for All Helps Unions by Taking Health Care Off the Bargaining Table

On February 11, the Nevada Culinary Workers Union publicly criticized Democratic front-runner Bernie Sanders’s Medicare for All plan ahead of the state’s Democratic presidential caucus. On February 12, Sanders responded, “Many, many unions throughout this country — including some in Unite Here, and the Culinary Union is part of Unite Here — absolutely understand that we’ve got to move to Medicare for All.”

Sanders continued, “When everybody in America has comprehensive health care, and when we join the rest of the industrialized world by guaranteeing health care to all people, unions can then negotiate for higher wages, better working conditions, better pensions. So, I think the future for unions is through Medicare for All.”

After Sanders’s statement, the Culinary Union’s Secretary-Treasurer Geoconda Argüello-Kline denounced Sanders and his supporters, stating, “It’s disappointing Senator Sanders’ supporters have viciously attacked the Culinary Union & working families in NV simply because we provided facts on proposals that might takeaway what we have built over 8 decades.” The Culinary Union was joined in denouncing the Sanders camp by fellow Democratic presidential candidates Elizabeth Warren and Amy Klobuchar. On February 13, Pete Buttigieg joined with Klobuchar, Warren and the Culinary Union in promoting condemnations of the Democratic front-runner and Medicare for All.

Ironically Warren’s campaign staff repeatedly crossed the Culinary Union’s picket line in March 2019.

Flashback to September 17, 2019: General Motors confirmed to the press that it had ceased payment for the health care coverage of striking United Auto Workers (UAW). On the same day, presidential candidate Joe Biden addressed members of the AFL-CIO on his health plan, stating, “I have a significant health care plan. But guess what? Under mine, you can keep your health insurance you’ve bargained for if you like it.” For the striking UAW members, the choice of keeping private health insurance that was bargained for wasn’t an option.

Talking points touting “choice” have frustrated advocates of Medicare for All and sympathetic union members this election cycle. Biden, Warren and Klobuchar aren’t the only candidates this primary season to promote the “choice” argument: Former Democratic presidential candidates Kamala Harris, Tim Ryan and John Delaney have parroted similar statements in promotion of their proposed health plans.

Earlier on February 12, Buttigieg joined Biden and company in echoing familiar “choice”-focused talking points, tweeting, “There are 14 million union workers in America who have fought hard for strong, employer-provided health benefits. Medicare for All Who Want It protects their plans and union members’ freedom to choose the coverage that’s best for them.”

Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants (AFA), fired back, “This is offensive and dangerous. Stop perpetuating this gross myth. Not every union member has union healthcare plans that protect them. Those that do have it, have to fight like hell to keep it. If you believe in Labor then you’d understand an injury to one is an injury to all.”

Nelson later joined the Culinary Union leadership in denouncing “attacks” from Sanders supporters, rather criticisms of union management not directed at the rank and file. But Nelson has been a consistent advocate of Medicare for All and the AFA has stood with Sanders since 2016.

To paraphrase Nelson and her advocacy, Medicare for All is popular among organized workers. The 150,000 members of National Nurses United (NNU), the U.S.’s largest union of registered nurses, have organized the charge on behalf of patients and fellow workers. NNU and AFA aren’t alone: Over 600 locals, 22 national unions, 44 State AFL-CIOs and 158 Central Labor Councils and Area Labor Federations have endorsed the single-payer legislation. Even with strong support from many rank and file members, some union leaders have shied away from Medicare for All in order to adjust their sails to the political winds at a moment’s notice.

Talking points and political triangulation aside, Biden, Buttigieg and others aren’t wrong for stating that unions have fought tooth-and-nail for health benefits. They have certainly done so, and at great expense to wage increases and membership organizing. But Biden and Buttigieg missed a point in their “choice”-centered pitch — the public option plan that they, along with Warren and Klobuchar, are running on will leave health care on the negotiating table for organized workers.

Through a single-payer system and Medicare for All legislation, health care can finally be lifted from the bargaining table. Single-payer will allow more freedom for unions and replaces a system that keeps workers and patients at the mercy of executives and private insurers with one that recognizes the urgency to treat health care as a right, not a bargaining tool for bosses to hold over workers’ heads.

Removing Health Care From Bargaining

The benefits of organized labor backing Medicare for All over the public option are immense. Unions won’t have to waste negotiating capital fighting to merely preserve health benefits. Under a single-payer model, unions can use resources otherwise spent on retention of health benefits to instead organize new workplaces, fight for higher wages, fight for protections and safer working conditions. A single-payer system frees up organized labor to leverage their resources and membership in favor of gaining even more for their members.

If single-payer is realized, then union members will no longer be bound to tedious network-based health plans like Health Maintenance Organizations or Preferred Provider Organizations. Private insurance and the network “innovations” the market has created have significantly complicated the system and also limits choices for patients. With Medicare for All, patients, whether they be unionized or non-union, will be able to choose their provider and no longer be confined to networks, which a public option framework would maintain.

Under the public option, union members are tied to the benefits of their plan, which sometimes doesn’t cover necessary services. In other words, some union plans have coverage gaps where services like mental health care or long-term care aren’t covered. Medicare for All expands these services to everyone and eliminates the coverage gaps imposed by private insurance. Union members will receive more comprehensive benefits under Medicare for All than under their current private health insurance plans.

Single-payer systems also famously have improved outcomes compared to the American model of private employer-sponsored mixed insurance with an underfunded public insurer. Metrics in terms of quality, cost and access in the American health system have historically lagged behind nations with single-payer models. Under Medicare for All, union members can expect to receive health services that exceed or are at the same quality as the plans they fought for with more health services covered.

Unions also will no longer have to worry if an employer wants to change insurers. Under single-payer, union representatives at the bargaining table can be at ease knowing that their members will have guaranteed, comprehensive health coverage through Medicare for All. The single-payer model throws in the added benefit of eliminating the laborious process of switching health insurance carriers for union workers.

For public sector unions, single-payer will eliminate cost sharing, which is how the business-minded Republican and Democrat governments have passed the cost along to public employees. Cost sharing has forced public union workers to increasingly take a larger personal share of the expense for health coverage. With Medicare for All, unionized public employees can be assured that their hard-earned paychecks stay in their pockets and are not increasingly spent on health costs.

Medicare for All is also more than just getting health care off the bargaining table for unions, it’s about harnessing the energy of movement politics to create a new labor movement. Wages have stagnated since the ‘80s, workers are toiling for longer hours, wealth that has been created by workers is becoming increasingly concentrated in the hands of a few individuals. Labor has been under attack by business-friendly lawmakers and judges on all levels of government for decades. In an era of popular political movements, unions finally have the political climate to fight back.

Medicare for All can revitalize and invigorate a labor movement that has largely been on the defensive. In nations where health care is guaranteed as a human right through single-payer, unions are leading the way in combating pension “reforms” and uniting with non-organized labor against undignified working conditions. Countries with single-payer models have proven that when health care is removed from bargaining, unions thrive and are leaders against the features of an economic system designed to benefit the few.

The transition to a single-payer system is an opportunity for unions to join together to secure health care as a right for all workers, benefits that are the same quality or better, and expand choices and services for their members. All while leveraging the energy that could build working-class power and usher in a new dawn for the labor movement.

Union members have built an enormous amount of wealth for all. The people who got all of us the weekend and the eight-hour work day deserve better than a health system that holds their health care second to employers’ bargaining tactics and the profits of private insurers.

The “choice” arguments pushed by the defenders of private insurance are misleading on Medicare for All. Single-payer will save workers money, expand their freedoms and end the absurdity of toying with workers’ health care by executives to pad balance sheets. It’s crucial for labor to keep in mind management’s callous bargaining tactics like the striking auto workers faced: when employers stop paying for workers’ health benefits, there is no “choice.”

Medicare for All is the path forward for unions. The public option model doesn’t deliver in providing organized workers much needed relief in getting health care off the negotiation table. Getting health care away from the grips of employers and adding Medicare for All to the list of political must-dos is a top priority for organized labor.

This content was originally published here.

Ancient History Of Dentistry

    AncientPages.com – If you think going to a dentist is an awful thing, be thankful you didn’t live thousands of years ago. Our ancestors understood the importance of healthy teeth, but the methods and instruments used in those days were far from pleasant.

    Historical evidence proves that dentistry started around the areas of China,
    Egypt, India, Etruscans of Central Italy, Assyrians, and Japan. While exploring and researching mummies, archaeologists have learned a mouthful of information on ancient dentistry.

    The Edwin Smith Surgical Papyrus Sheds Light on Ancient Egyptian Dentistry

    There is a lot of historical evidence revealing that ancient Egyptians practiced medicine thousands of years ago .

    The Edwin Smith Papyrus is an ancient Egyptian medical text, named after the dealer who bought it in 1862, and the oldest known surgical treatise on trauma. The papyrus was written sometime before 3000 B.C. and it gives instructions on how to heal and treat wounds in the mouth.

    Although there were detailed instructions about curing mouth problems, the evidence and writings within this time lead people to believe that the actual teeth were still considered untreatable. To begin with minor dental work was performed, but later as the knowledge increased doctors were able to carry out more advanced procedures.

    The ancients doctors were familiar with almost all modern dental diseases.

    The earliest signs of dental surgery were between 3000 and 2500 B.C. and usually involved drilling out cavities or pulling teeth. It might be hard to imagine having your teeth drilled into without the comfort of shots and happy gas, but Egyptians by 1550 B.C had prescriptions for dental pain and injuries. Interestingly, through all these years, there has never been any evidence in mummies or writings that mechanical or false teeth were ever used. This has been somewhat of a surprise to scientists as we would expect ancient Egyptians who were rather lavish to replace missing front teeth with artificial teeth.

    Nevertheless, ancient Egyptians have also been credited with the invention of toothpaste. The world’s oldest-known recipe for toothpaste comes from ancient Egypt in fact. When discovered, the Egyptian toothpaste formula formula from the 4th century AD caused a sensation among dentists who described it as an advanced recipe “ahead of its time”.

    Egyptians are believed to have started using a paste to clean their teeth around 5000BC, before toothbrushes were invented. Ancient Greeks and Romans are known to have used toothpastes, and people in China and India first used toothpaste around 500BC.

    Etruscan Civilization Experimented With Golden Teeth

    The Etruscans were a group of agricultural people who evolved into an urban population of craftsmen, traders, and navigators who lived in a network of cities and dominated the area of the Mediterranean around Italy in the 8th and 9th centuries BC. The origins of the Etruscans are lost in prehistory, but the main hypotheses are that they are indigenous, probably stemming from the Villanovan culture, or that they are the result of invasion from the north or the Near East.

    The Etruscan people were very intelligent and always strived to increase their knowledge in a number of areas, such as for example medicine and dentistry. The courage to travel across sea to trade with other civilizations is proof of their industrious and courageous personalities. Archaeological discoveries reveal that their image was important to them and they were the first people were to take basic work in the mouth to a more artistic level. Using the knowledge of dentistry they learned from travel, they began to experiment with filling gold teeth.

    In one preserved mouth, gold bands were wrapped around the teeth and cemented by soldering with heat. Human and animal teeth were used as artificial teeth and held in place by gold bands. Performed around 700 B.C this is the first time in history a form of prosthetics was ever used in the mouth, and would be the only use for many years.

    The Etruscan prostheses were remarkable because they used gold bands which were soldered into rings instead of the gold wires which are seen in other cultures (Egyptians, Phoenicians) of the same time.

    Ancient Greek Dentistry

    Some years ago, a mummy was found with many devastating dental problems. Around 2,100 years ago, at a time when Egypt was ruled by a dynasty of Greek kings, a young wealthy man from Thebes was nearing the end of his life. Rather than age, he may have died from a basic sinus infection caused from a life of painful cavities. The man, whose name is unknown, was in his 20s or early 30s. A modern-day dentist would have a hard time dealing with the young man’s severe condition and one can imagine that the ancient dentist must have felt overwhelmed.

    A 3D reconstruction of the 2,100-year-old mummy’s teeth. They were in horrible shape with “numerous” abscesses and cavities, problems that may have resulted in a sinus infection, possibly fatal.
    Credit: Image courtesy International Journal of Paleopathology.

    Greek dentists struggled to stop and cure his cavities. Linen soaked in medicine was packed in the holes in his teeth in an attempt to relieve the pain. Cloth in the tooth prevented food from entering and festering in the area. Greeks prided themselves in their strength and ability to handle pain. So, when cavities were found in the teeth, Greeks would often deal with the pain rather than have the tooth pulled. Losing a tooth would be a great loss and the pain was a small price to pay, but at the end the ancient dentists failed and the man died.

    When the unknown men died he was mummified, his brain and many of his organs taken out, resin put in and his body wrapped. Curiously, embalmers left his heart inside the body, a sign perhaps of his elite status.

    Dentistry In Ancient China

    The history of dentistry in China is closely aligned with the remarkable developments in Chinese medicine over at least six millennia.

    Rudimentary dental extractions were performed as early as 6000 BC, when the first signs of adornment with human teeth were described. Around 2700 BC ancient Chinese started using used acupuncture to treat pain associated with tooth decay. Doctors in ancient China treated toothaches with arsenic about A.D. 1000. They are also noted for their development of using silver amalgam for filling teeth. The Chinese were particularly advanced in their observation of the oral cavity.

    In an ancient work called the Canon of Medicine, dentistry is discussed.A section of this work is dedicated specifically to mastication and deglutition. The Chinese were also interested in systemic diseases and their connection to oralmanifestations. For example, they recognized that prior to the development of measles, white spots would appear in a person’s oral cavity.  Another significant area of study among Chinese surgeons in Chinese history of dentistry was oral surgery. Scientists have discovered many writings regarding the extraction of teeth and the instruments utilized to perform such tasks.

    The great Sung landscapist Li T’ang depicts a country doctor cauterizing a patient’s
    arm by burning it with the powdered leaves of an aromatic plant. The treatment is
    called Moxibustion , which is widely used along with acupuncture for treatment such as relieving toothache.

    In addition, information has been found in Chinese history of dentistry relating to the abscesses of teeth and other oral structures. The Chinese based many treatments for abscesses on scientific observation. Finally, the Chinese surgeons delved extensively into surgery techniques of the oral cavity..

    There were actually four distinct periods of medical development in China: the Mystical Period; the Golden Period; the Controversial Period; and the Transitional Period. The Golden Period was marked by the appearance of the first textbooks to describe preventive and restorative dental techniques, as well as the first colleges. Dentistry then moved through the dark times of the Controversial Period, when war mongering stymied progress. Lasting until 1800 AD, it came to an end with the domination of Western medicine and dentistry.

    In Mesopotamia Diseases Were Often Blamed On Pre-Existing Spirits And Gods

    Before the advent of the current medical establishment, many ancient cultures had believed that worms were the cause of various illnesses and diseases such as tooth decay known as cavities today.In fact, tooth worms have a long history, first appearing in a Sumerian text around 5,000 BC.

    References to tooth worms can be found in China, Egypt and India long before the belief finally takes root (pun intended) into Western Europe in the 8th century.

    For example, the Chinese believed there were worms in the teeth that caused tooth decay and pain. They had several remedies that they employed successfully to kill these worms.

    The ancient Babylonians had also believed that worms in the form of demons had caused diseases in people.

    In Mesopotamia diseases were blamed on pre-existing spirits and gods. Each spirit was held responsible for only one of what we would call a disease in any one part of the body. So usually “Hand of God X” of the stomach corresponds to what we call a disease of the stomach. A number of diseases simply were identified by names, “bennu” for example.
    Clay tablets contained more than 100,000 cuneiform scripts belonging to the Sumerians, Babylonians and Assyrians who lived in Mesopotamia were collected. In 700 BC, Asurbanipal, the Assyrian king, collected these scripts in a library built in Ninova. Among these tablets there were some parts about toothache. The laws of King Hammurabi, which had been responsible for the lack of surgical development, brought social and legal responsibilities to doctors for the first time.

    In Mesopotamia gods and spirits were blamed for diseases.

    Among these rules that reached us today is “an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth”. If the person damaged the tooth of another person of the same social class, then his tooth should be removed. However, if he damaged the tooth of another person of lower social class, he was fined 166 gr of silver to be paid to the other person.

    By examining the surviving medical tablets it is clear that there were two distinct types of professional medical practitioners in ancient Mesopotamia who also treated toothaches.

    The first type of practitioner was the ashipu, in older accounts of Mesopotamian medicine often called a “sorcerer.” One of the most important roles of the ashipu was to diagnose the ailment. In the case of internal diseases, this most often meant that the ashipu determined which god or demon was causing the illness. The ashipu could also attempt to cure the patient by means of charms and spells that were designed to entice away or drive out the spirit causing the disease. The ashipu could also refer the patient to a different type of healer called an asu. He was a specialist in herbal remedies, and in older treatments of Mesopotamian medicine was frequently called “physician” because he dealt in what were often classifiable as empirical applications of medication.

    Dentistry has evolved over time from a rather barbaric practice to a technologically advanced industry. Preventative maintenance such as teeth cleanings help people avoid some of the serious problems that people of the past were faced with when it came to teeth.

    Copyright © AncientPages.com All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of AncientPages.com

    Expand for references

    References:

    Ancient History Encyclopedia – Etruscan Civilization

    Loevy HT, Kowitz AA. – The dawn of dentistry: dentistry among the Etruscans

    Live Science – Mummy with Mouthful of Cavities Discovered

    Gentle Dental – Ancient Dentistry

    Xu Y1, MacEntee MI. – The roots of dentistry in ancient China

    Dr. Muna –  Chinese history of dentistry

    Smile The Dental Magazine – Dentistry in Ancient Civilizations

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      Buttigieg wants to give illegal immigrants health insurance – and he wants you to pay for it

      Pete Buttigieg…reparations for slavery, decriminalize all drugs, and now this?If a Democrat is elected to the presidency in November, it is going to cost you a lot of money. Tons.

      On Sunday, Buttigieg told an illegal immigrant that if he was elected president, they would have taxpayer-funded health care.

      Ooh boy!

      “As you know the Affordable Care Act, one of the many missing pieces that it has is that the exchanges are not available to the undocumented,” he said. “I would change that and that would be a change that would come with the ‘Medicare-for-All-Who-Want-It’ plan that I am proposing.”

      Buttigieg was speaking at a political exchange with Planned Parenthood in Nevada.

      While speaking to an illegal immigrant, Buttigieg told her that he viewed her as an American despite her illegal status. What a tool.

      A DACA recipient asks Buttigieg how he’d fix access to health care for the undocumented like her- he tells her “first of all, this should go w/o saying but it’s important to say out loud, that I regard you and all DACA recipients as American as I am or anybody else in this room.” pic.twitter.com/iV2BI9uFJX

      — DJ Judd (@DJJudd) February 16, 2020

      “So, first of all, this should go without saying but it’s important to say out loud that I regard you and all DACA recipients as American as I am or anybody else is in this room,” he said.

      Absolutely sickening. As the child of immigrants who came here LEGALLY, the dumbing down of the term “American” is repulsive.

      Last December, Buttigieg also said that he wanted to open up taxpayer-funded healthcare to illegals during a conversation with a voter in Spanish. 

      “So the most important thing for me is that we offer the opportunity for health care to all in our country, and this includes the opportunity to buy this plan of Medicare-for-All-who-want-it,” he said based on a translation of his remarks.

      “This is our solution. And this opportunity to buy this plan is for everyone regardless of their immigration status,” he continued.

      At the time, Republican National Chairwoman Ronna McDaniel responded to Buttigieg’s comments.

      “I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again. Just because Pete Buttigieg is from Indiana does not make him a moderate.”

      Buttigieg had said as far back as last June that he thought people in the country illegally should be allowed to obtain government healthcare.

      “That needs to be available to everyone, there needs to be a way for people of any immigration status to participate,” he said. Buttigieg was speaking at the “We Decide” forum hosted by Planned Parenthood’s political arm.

      Govt. healthcare for illegal aliens?

      PETE BUTTIGIEG: “That needs to be available to everyone, (government healthcare) there needs to be a way for people of any immigration status to participate,”

      We Decide” forum hosted by Planned Parenthood’s political arm – 06-22-19

      — Nicholas Jones (@voyager4truth) August 9, 2019

      They are still receiving taxpayer funding why???

      According to the Cato Institute, Buttigieg’s rhetoric that he wants to turn Medicare into a “public option” where all Americans would have the choice of participating in the program without being forced to do so rings hollow.

      Buttigieg makes the claim that, “I trust the American people to make the right choice for them. Not my way or the highway.”

      He basically ides the fact that his plan would essentially create a single-payer health program, and would reduce Americans’ healthcare choices.

      The Cato Foundation says that while Buttigieg implies his program would be “optional”, that is not the case. They state:

      • He would automatically enroll uninsured Americans in Medicare and it would cost them up to $7,000—whether they want it or not.
      • He would force Americans to pony up an additional $1.7 trillion in taxes==more than all the on-budget tax increases in Obamacare combined—whether they want to pay those taxes or not.

      A public option is not about expanding choice, but rather eliminating any choice. According to Prof. Jacob Hacker, the purpose of the “public option” is to eliminate private insurance and create a government run single payer health system.

      Buttigieg can call his plan whatever he wants, however it is not “Medicare for All Who Want It.” It is single payer, “Medicare for All.” Period.

      And Buttigieg wants US to pay for illegal aliens to ostensibly get “free” health insurance. What a deal.

      As we reported last week, when Pete Buttigieg isn’t spouting ideals of decriminalizing drug possession charges on the campaign trail, he’s effectively plagiarizing immigration stances and rebranding them as his own.

      During a townhall in Merrimack, New Hampshire, Buttigieg suggested that small-town America should welcome increased waves of legal immigrants to drive up… population growth.

      Apparently, the idea is that there’s potential economic benefits to inundating rural communities with more people – which is possible. Yet, like a coin toss, there’s also the possibility of economic downfalls when a traditionally smaller city has a sudden population boom.

      During the townhall, Buttigieg stated:

      “I’m proposing what we call “Community Renewal Visas” that when a community that is very much in need of growing its population, recognizes that, and makes a choice to welcome more than its share of new Americans that we create a fast-track, if they apply for an allotment of visas, that goes to those who are willing to be in those areas that maybe are hurting for population but have great potential.”

      SOME of What “MODERATE” Buttigieg actually ADMITS to
      ♦️All drugs including Meth & Cocaine decriminalized
      ♦️Late term Infanticide
      ♦️Felons voting
      ♦️Scrap electoral college
      ♦️Implement New Green deal
      ♦️Name & Shame “white” Hate
      ♦️Nationwide gun control
      ♦️Fast track immigration

      — 𝐋𝐞𝐚𝐡 🇺🇸🎸🌴 (@LeahR77) February 10, 2020

      His idea sounds nearly identical to one that was published back in April 2019, which called this type of initiative “Heartland Visas”.  

      The “Heartland Visas” study tactfully found ways to explain things like when more people move into rural areas, more houses get built and get more expensive – which higher priced houses are good for the economy.

      Yeah, higher-priced homes are lucrative for developers and Wall Street personas, not people trying to buy homes.

      If President, @PeteButtigieg will decide if a community is “very much in need of growing its population” and he will make sure to send many more immigrants there on “fast-track” visas. https://t.co/ckpfnTQrSR

      — NumbersUSA (@NumbersUSA) February 12, 2020

      Then again, the leadership behind the Economic Innovation Group, who published the study, happens to host quite a bit of the investor types.

      You’ve got Sean Parker, the co-founder of Facebook and Napster – who has a net worth somewhere around $7 billion.

      You’ve got Chris Slevin, former legislative director for Senator Cory Booker. Their leadership section even proudly says that they’re composed of “policy experts, start-up founders, investors, and academics”.

      You should always be critical of economics papers that are backed by these types of personas – and question where the loyalties lie. Mass immigration is usually lobbied by big business, and what’s not to love as the owner of behemoth companies?

      You get the benefit of flooded labor markets, driving labor costs down. You also get an instant consumer boost, depending on what your company peddles. And of course, there’s big government right around the corner to get a few extra bucks in taxes.

      Everyone wins – well, except the middle class and those lower on the economic totem pole.

      Not surprisingly, most Americans don’t want to see an increase in immigration year over year.

      Currently, the United States population is around 327 million, but if immigration policies weren’t changed throughout the years we’d likely have a population of about 251 million people. Since 1965, the United States has accepted over 75 million people to date via immigration.

      Throughout the years, we’ve gone from accepting 250,000 immigrants annually, to then 500,000 a year, and by 1990 Congress decided a million or more annually is a good number.

      If we keep that trend going just as is, we’ll have a population nationally to the tune of 404 million people by 2060.

      Is there anything genuinely wrong about legal immigration – no, far from. But there has to be a point where someone looks at the numbers and says “We’ve got to take care of our own first”.

      Buttigieg has flirted with the idea of increasing H-1B visas going out as well, which takes skilled jobs off the market for legal citizens. Bringing in too many medium-to-high skilled immigrants drives down those labor costs, much like how overflowing with low-skilled immigrants hurts low-skilled labor costs.

      Good work by @CBedfordDC refuting the myth that Pete Buttigieg is some kind of moderate. “From health care and abortion to guns and immigration, and from the Supreme Court to the Electoral College, the man is decidedly a radical.” https://t.co/4phL3pNNJj

      — Giancarlo Sopo (@GiancarloSopo) February 4, 2020

      Overall, the idea of just creating an influx of immigrant populations in rural communities to improve economic conditions just doesn’t make sense at all. And it seems that only a select few stand to benefit greatly from it.  

      LET has a private home for those who support emergency responders and vets called LET Unity.  We reinvest the proceeds into sharing untold stories of those patriotic Americans. Click to check it out.

      As alluded to earlier, Presidential hopeful Mayor Pete Buttigieg intends to take prison out of the equation for people convicted of possession of drugs like heroin, meth, and cocaine.

      In an interview that was held on Fox News Sunday, he believes that treatment is the only route that should be taken with those hemmed up on possession charges.

      Buttigieg jumped into his rationale with a portion of his version of criminal justice reform with Chris Wallace recently, and the topic of prosecuting possession of drugs came up.

      The South Bend, Indiana mayor indicated that if he were to become president, possession charges would no longer land someone in prison. While claiming that the “war on drugs” has failed, Buttigieg said the only remedy at this point is delivering treatment to those who are in possession of all sorts of narcotics.

      Wallace asked the mayor the following:

      “You not only want to decriminalize marijuana, you want to decriminalize all drug possession. You say that the better answer … is rather treatment, not incarceration.

      But isn’t the fact that it’s illegal to have, possess meth and heroin, doesn’t that in some way — the fact that it’s illegal — act as a deterrent to actually trying it in the first place?”

      Buttigeig responded with:

      “Well, I think the main thing that we should focus on is distribution and the harm that’s done there. Yes, of course it’s important that it remain illegal.”

      The back and forth continued briefly, as the host was confused at Buttigieg claiming that drug possession should remain illegal.

      Wallace addressed the confusion by telling Buttigieg that his own website claims that he would “decriminalize” drug possession completely. When the bluff was called on the mayor, he responded with citing how everything else just hasn’t worked up to this point.

      When he acknowledged that his campaign website did mention decriminalizing possession charges, he stated:

      The point is, not the legal niceties, the point is we have learned through 40 years of a failed war on drugs that criminalizing addiction doesn’t work. Not only that, the incarceration does more harm than the offense it’s intended to deal with.”

      There’s so many issues and questions that could be levied at Buttigieg’s idea on addressing drug crime. What about criminal cases where someone is initially charged with higher crimes, and then signs a plea bargain that only lists “possession”?

      Furthermore, what data suggests that delivered treatment programs are more successful than incarceration of drug possession offenders?

      According to his own plan online, he aims to enact the following if elected:

      “On the federal level, eliminate incarceration for drug possession, reduce sentences for other drug offenses and apply these reductions retroactively, and expunge past convictions.

      Research shows that incarceration for drug offenses has no effect on drug misuse, drug arrests, or overdose deaths. In fact, some studies show that incarceration actually increases the rate of overdose deaths. We cannot incarcerate ourselves out of this public health problem.”

      So, there’s truth to the mayor’s notion that there’s some studies that show jail or prison hasn’t been stellar in dealing with drug crime and offenses.

      Yet, according to the American Addiction Centers, no one has been able to quantify if any rehab programs genuinely works in the long run either.

      In fact, the AAC says that any touted success rates of rehab programs can’t be trusted at all:

      “Since many treatment centers do not follow up with their patients, the “100 percent” success rate some cite only applies to those who complete the length of their stay.

      Even those who boast a more modest “30 percent success rate” only draw that figure from the immediate sobriety rates after treatment, not from six months or three years down the road.”

      Considering that many rehab facilities claim that they’re a success by only having someone complete their program – what exactly is the average program length for any given addiction?

      According to Advanced Recovery Systems, you could be a success story anywhere from 4 days to a little over 4 months of treatment.

      ARS showed that detox programs are on average only 4 days, whereas residential style treatment is around 16 days. Some of the longer programs like expanded residential treatment averages out at 90 days and outpatient treatment is typically 130 days.

      Despite rehab programs originating in 1864, when they were called “sober houses”, we still can’t say if that works either or would be even better than jail or prison-time for drug offenders.

      Not to mention, where there’s drug possession – there’s usually other crime too. The DOJ has been quite hip to that fact since the well-crafted study published in 1994 showed that where there’s drugs, there’s all sorts of other crimes being committed.

      Case in point, while finding the magic cure for addiction would be great – keeping people off the street who use drugs like heroin, meth, and cocaine keeps drug fueled crimes from affecting the population. Clearly, Buttigieg hasn’t thought this one out very well.

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      The post Buttigieg wants to give illegal immigrants health insurance – and he wants you to pay for it appeared first on Law Enforcement Today.

      This content was originally published here.

      Dentistry: Root canal work not so bad after all — ScienceDaily

      Dr Tallan Chew, postgraduate student, Adelaide Dental School, University of Adelaide co-authored the study.

      “Information about 1096 randomly selected Australian people aged 30-61 was collected through questionnaires, dental records and treatment receipts in 2009. Their self-rated dental health score was checked when they had their dental work and two years later,” she says.

      “Patients who had root canal work reported similar oral health-related quality of life as people who had other types of dental work.

      “The effect of root canal work on patients’ oral health-related quality of life was compared to other kinds of dental work such as tooth extraction, restoration of teeth, repairs to the teeth or gum treatment, preventative treatment and cleaning.”

      Every year millions of root canal treatments are performed globally (more than 22 million in the USA alone), which may have a profound positive effect on the quality of life of patients. A root canal treatment repairs and saves a tooth that is badly decayed or is infected. During a root canal procedure, the nerve and pulp are removed and the inside of the tooth is cleaned and sealed. Most people associate having root canal work with a lot of pain and discomfort.

      “There is growing interest in the dental profession to better understand the effect and impact oral diseases and their associated treatment, such as root canal work, have on patients’ quality of life,” says Professor Giampiero Rossi-Fedele, Head of Endodontics at Adelaide Dental School, University of Adelaide who co-authored the study.

      “A biopsychosocial view of health is increasingly replacing a purely biomedical model.

      “Treatment outcomes need to be re-examined from a patient-based perspective using self-reported measures as this more accurately reflects the patients’ perception of treatment outcomes and the effect it has on their overall well-being.

      “Patient-reported treatment outcomes are now the principle driving force behind treatment needs, as opposed to clinician-based treatment outcomes.

      “With this change in emphasis, the perspectives of patients and their relatives are important factors in identifying need for treatment, treatment planning, and determining outcomes from any health care intervention as part of shared decision making,” says Professor Rossi-Fedele.

      This content was originally published here.

      Body camera video: Florida girl forced to go to mental health facility asked officer if she was going to jail – CBS News

      A police officer who was transporting the 6-year-old Florida girl who was forced to go to a mental health facility after an incident at school is heard calling her “pleasant” on body camera footage. She also openly questions why the girl is being taken away.

      Nadia King was removed from school under the Baker Act, a law allowing authorities to force a psychiatric evaluation on anyone considered to be a danger to themselves or others. According to a sheriff’s report, a social worker who responded to the incident at Love Grove Elementary School in Jacksonville said Nadia was “destroying school property” and “attacking staff.”

      But, the police body camera video shows a Duval County sheriff’s deputy leading a seemingly calm Nadia out of school on February 4. Nadia is heard asking the officer, “Am I going to jail?”

      “No, you’re not going to jail,” the officer says.

      Inside the police car, Nadia asks the officer if she has snacks. “No, I don’t have any snacks. I wish I did. I’m sorry,” the officer says.

      The deputy is also heard talking to another officer about Nadia’s behavior while she is in custody.

      “She’s been actually very pleasant. Right? Very pleasant,” the officer says.

      “I think it’s more of them just not knowing how to deal with it,” the other officer says.

      At one point, it appears Nadia, who has ADHD and a mood disorder, did not understand where she was going. 

      “It’s a field trip?” she asks.

      “Well I call it a field trip, anything away from school is a field trip, right?” an officer replies. 

      Nadia was held in a mental health facility, away from her mother, for 48 hours. Her mother, Martina Falk, broke down while watching the body camera video.

      “I can’t comment,” she said.

      Falk’s attorney, Reganel Reeves, said, “She’s mortified. She’s horrified. Angry.”

      They argue Nadia should have never been taken to the mental health center.

      “If you can’t deal with a 50-pound child, 6-year-old, then you shouldn’t be in education,” Reeves said.  

      Officials with Duval County Public Schools said student privacy laws prevent them from discussing details of the case. They did not respond to the body camera video, but said in an earlier statement that an initial review showed the school’s handing was “compliant both with law and the best interest of this student and all other students at the school.”

      The family now plans to file a lawsuit.

      “She’s going on a field trip to hell. That’s where she was going, and her life has forever changed,” Reeves said.

      This content was originally published here.